Mystery as SECOND doctor who treated poisoned Putin enemy Alexei Navalny dies after ‘stroke’

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MYSTERY surrounds the death of a second doctor who treated poisoned Putin enemy Alexei Navalny.

Rustam Agishev, 63, who worked at the acute poisoning unit hospital in Siberia, died after “suffering a stroke”, claim health bosses.

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Rustam Agishev – a second mysterious death in the wake of Navalny’s poisoning[/caption]

EPA

Traces of the nerve agent Novichok were found in samples taken from Alexei Navalny[/caption]

AP

The US imposed sanctions to punish Russia after the poisoning of Navalny, a critic of Vladimir Putin[/caption]

Radio Free Europe reported that Omsk emergency hospital No. 1 said in a statement that Agishev passed away on March 26.

“In December last year, Rustam Agishev suffered a stroke and was unable to get over that illness,” according to the statement.

Radio Free Europe noted that it “did not mention foul play as a possible cause of death”.

But his passing comes two months after the death of the deputy chief physician for anaesthesiology and resuscitation at the hospital.

Dr Sergei Maksimishin was reportedly in charge of intensive care at the hospital in Omsk, Siberia where the arch Putin-foe was taken after he became seriously ill.

The Russian doctor who saved Navalny from Novichok poisoning was reportedly found dead after a “sudden heart attack”.

A colleague, Maria Morozova, who saw Dr Maksimishin, said his death was “very unexpected”.

Back in February, The Sun wrote that he was allegedly “liquidated” to stop him sharing details of Navalny’s attempted assassination.

Omsk Ministry of Health

Dr Sergei Maksimishin, who treated Alexei Navalny, was found dead in February[/caption]

A report alleged the medic was “poisoned”, but not as a result of the Novichok – a nerve agent used in the plot against Navalny.

“The issue is not whether he was involved in the treatment of Alexei Navalny, but the reason for his liquidation was his readiness to share information about the treatment that he had access to,” said a post on a Telegram channel called General SVR.

The channel – which claims access to leaked secrets from the Russian elite – did not give any direct evidence for its claim to “know and affirm” about the doctor’s fatal poisoning.

The same outlet has previously made unsubstantiated allegations about Putin’s health.

Navalny, 44, fell ill on a flight in Siberia in August and was airlifted to Germany, where doctors concluded he had been poisoned with a nerve agent.

The Kremlin has continued to deny any role in his illness and said it had seen no proof he was poisoned.

Navalny was arrested in January on his return from Germany following treatment for poisoning with what many Western countries say was a military-grade nerve agent.

He was jailed on February 2 for parole violations, on what he says were politically motivated charges, and sent to a penal colony.

This verdict sparked outrage across Russia as thousands of protesters took to the streets and clashed with riot cops.   

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Navalny was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in prison for violating the terms of his probation while convalescing in Germany[/caption]

Putin’s foe was hospitalised in Omsk last August in a poison attack

At the time, Prime Minister Boris Johnson joined other world leaders in declaring support for Navalny, while urging for him to “be released immediately”.

In early March, the EU and the US imposed sanctions on Russia for Navalny’s poisoning and imprisonment.

But US President Joe Biden stopped short, however, of putting sanctions on Putin himself.

“The intelligence community assesses with high confidence that officers of Russia’s Federal Security Service (FSB) used a nerve agent to poison Russian opposition leader Alexi Navalny,” White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki said.

There are fears that Navalny’s health is deteriorating in jail.

He’s accused prison authorities of failing to provide proper treatment for his back pain and leg problems.

In a letter shared on March 25, he said his physical condition has worsened in prison and he now has trouble walking.

Prison officials are failing to provide him with the right medicines and refusing to allow his doctor to visit him behind bars, the letter adds.

He also complained in a second letter that hourly checks a guard makes on him at night amounted to sleep deprivation torture.


Navalny’s lawyer, Olga Mikhailova, said after visiting him in prison that “his right leg is in terrible shape.”

His wife, Yulia, denounced the treatment of her husband in prison as part of Putin’s “personal revenge”.

But Putin spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters that the Kremlin wasn’t following updates of Navalny’s condition in jail.

 

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