The Evolution of Jeezy and Gucci Mane’s Relationship

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The Evolution of Jeezy and Gucci Mane's Relationship

Over one million people tuned in Thursday night to the Verzuz livestream to watch Jeezy and Gucci Mane go head-to-head after beefing for the past fifteen years.

It was a heart-warming moment when Jeezy extended an olive branch to Gucci and he accepted it after dissing him all night.

Many fans thought it was photoshopped when La Flare announced that he replaced T.I. in the battle. Plus, Gucci declined to participate in the celebration claiming they’d have to compensate him $1 million.

But it finally happened and it was cringy! Gucci clearly attended with the point to be as disrespectful as possible. Jeezy thankfully held his composure and played a huge part in the monumental moment.

Hip Hop fans critiqued Gucci for behaving immaturely and accepting the challenge when he’s clearly holding on to the trauma that stemmed from his feud with Snow Man.

But to understand Gucci’s perspective, you’ve got to know that this rap beef started petty and ended deadly.

Young Jeezy and Gucci Mane began their working relationship with the song “Black Tee,” which was a flip to Dem Franchise Boyz’s hit single, “White Tee.” In his autobiography, Gucci compared Jeezy to a “poor man’s Trick Daddy,” and in true Gucci fashion, he opened doors for his fellow ATLien.

The beef all started over the track “So Icy” which Jeezy wanted his debut album, Thug Motivation 101. But instead, it was on Gucci’s Trap House.

“So Icy” went on to peak at No. 46 on Billboard’s Hip Hop/R&B charts and had a huge impact in the South. Of course, Jeezy feeling like he missed out was big mad and later claimed that he wasn’t even paid for his appearance.

That same month, Jeezy also known as Snow Man at the time, dropped the Gucci diss record called “Stay Strapped” and put a bounty on his chain.

Guwop clearly caught wind of Jeezy’s song and quickly responded with the song, “Round 1.” Gucci prepared himself for one of Hip Hop’s long-standing cold wars when he said, “This is round one of Gucci Mane vs. Jeezy.”

Their war of words turned violent shortly after they traded diss tracks.

Gucci was trying to get some cuddy in May 2005 when four men broke into his home and began assaulting him. After they threatened to shoot him, Gucci jumped into survival mode and started shooting first. He ended up hitting Jeezy’s man and artist, Pookie Loc, who was found dead at a nearby elementary school.

A warrant was issued for Gucci’s arrest and he turned himself in. Murder was the case that they gave him but got off after claiming self-defense.

Gucci accused Jeezy of trying to kill him and spoke about their strained relationship in an old interview.

Even though Pookie Loc was signed to Jeezy’s label, he denied having any involvement in the mix-up.

He claimed Gucci was using the situation as leverage to sell his records, but the situation honestly sold itself.

Nine months after being charged with murder, Gucci was acquitted after maintaining that he acted in self-defense and a witness supported his claims. Prosecutors had no evidence of a murder case and let the rapper walk away.

Things were calm for five months after the acquittal until Gucci released “745” from left-field. He continued to defend retaliating against his attackers and continued claiming that Jeezy put the hit out.

Fast forward to the late 2000s mixtape era. DJ Drama was one of the hottest things out and he frequently collaborated with Young Jeezy. But clearly he didn’t have any loyalty to him because in 2008 DJ Drama collaborated with Gucci Mane for The Movie Gangster Grillz mixtape.

About four months later at the screening for Notorious, members from Jeezy’s crew got into a physical fight with Drama and his company. Jeezy later called the DJ the b-word and a “cornball” in an XXL Magazine.

Quality Control’s Coach K was no longer managing Jeezy by 2007, and assisted Gucci with his upcoming project, The State vs. Radric Davis, which went on to be his most successful project at the time.

Tension rebuilt between the two and Jeezy dropped another song called “24, 23” and he took another swipe at Gucci and OJ Da Juiceman.

The following month Gucci graced the cover of XXL for their second annual Hood 2 Hood cover alongside Shawty Lo, OJ, and Soulja Boy. In the cover story, the Atlanta rappers were asked about the possibility of reuniting with their former rivals.

Gucci started off saying he didn’t have an answer and acknowledged that beef is bad for business. But made it clear that he’s not tryna be “played for no pussy.”

Although Jeezy probably wasn’t feeling Gucci’s new team with members of his old circle, he called a truce in their beef live on DJ Drama’s radio show.

Gucci Mane was doing a six-month sentence at Fulton County Jail for a probation violation, but he announced that he’ll be collaborating with Jeezy again, and it seemed like things were taking a positive turn.

Until Waka Flocka and Gucci’s entourage got into a brawl with Jeezy’s crew outside of an Atlanta clothing store. Waka’s security discharged weapons during the altercation and Slick Pulla blacked the “Oh Let’s Do It” rapper’s eye. Gucci or Jeezy weren’t present during the incident but there was no talks of their possible collaboration again.

In fact, Gucci backpedaled and said he’d never work with Jeezy again but acknowledged that their beef was squashed on Sway’s Rap Fix Live.

A few months after, Jeezy also spoke to Sway and said their feud was all a misunderstanding. Apparently, he secretly had throat surgery and was unable to do a live performance of “So Icey” with Gucci and things went left from there.

It seemed like their beef was water under the bridge until Gucci appeared on The Breakfast Club and spoke about Rick Ross’ altercation with Jeezy at the 2012 BET Hip Hop Awards.

Jeezy responded days later clowning Gucci for his notorious ice cream face tattoo and called him “retarded.”

Gucci hopped in the booth and dropped one of the biggest songs to come out of the beef, “Truth.” In the song, Gucci referenced when he killed Pookie Loc in 2005. That same day, La Flare hopped on Twitter and bet $100K that he can beat Jeezy up.

A year later, Gucci Mane’s infamous Twitter moment when he called out the “Top 3 pussiest rappers tweeting, “Your Top 3 Pussy ass rappers? Mines? Jeezy, Yo gotti & Tip. No brainer. But there are 100s more….Go… #ww3.”

Jeezy didn’t respond to the diss track or additional commentary. It sounded like he was ready to move on from his last response. But he did open up about his friend’s death on his Church in These Streets album cut, “Forgive Me.” He denied any involvement in the incident once again rapping, ““Rest in peace to Pookie Loc, blame it on me never snitching/ Lord knows I ain’t send the homie on no dummy mission.”

Gucci Mane was released from jail in May 2016 and was in rare form. Some even believe this crazy conspiracy theory that he was cloned. There’s no proof that there’s any truth to that but he’s definitely a new, more calm Gucci.

In an interview, the late Hip Hop podcast pioneer Combat Jack asked Jeezy if he planned to speak to Gucci and he said I’m good luv, enjoy. “Imma tell you like N.O.R.E. I’m just focused on me, man” Jeezy offered. “Me and mine. If it got something to do with that. If it doesn’t. honest man I’m grown.”

Now it’s 2020 and we’re bracing for a second wave of the coronavirus pandemic. This year has been a movie and Gucci and Jeezy being in the same room is very on-brand for 2020.

Thankfully the night ended peacefully and it was a teaching moment to anyone holding a grudge.

The post The Evolution of Jeezy and Gucci Mane’s Relationship appeared first on The Source.

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